UOB and Mobile Internet Banking

Just last month, DBS/POSB finally removed Java from its iBanking site, thus allowing iPhone/iPod Touch users to connect directly to their iBanking site from Safari. And this month, it rolled out its own iPhone app for DBS and POSB mobile banking.

I tried out the POSB app, and it’s really good. For those of you on UOB, internet banking remains elusive. You could badger them to improve support on iPhone/iPad and other mobile devices by removing Java and/or making their own app.

Send them an email via “Contact Us” link under Personal Banking: http://www.uob.com.sg/contact/index.html

Select: General / Website Feedback

Here’s the message I sent:

Hi,

Most major banks like Citibank, StanChart, OCBC and now DBS/POSB support internet banking on popular mobile devices such as the iPhone/iPad. OCBC and DBS/POSB even have their own apps on the iPhone to facilitate internet banking.

However, UOB continues to use Java as part of its login mechanism for internet banking, which locks out the iPhone/iPad and other mobile devices that do not support Java—a legacy and unnecessary technology for internet banking.

When would UOB remove Java as part of its login mechanism so that your customers could easily do internet banking via their mobile devices?

13 Responses to “UOB and Mobile Internet Banking”

  1. Ben says:

    Lol tell me if they ever reply

  2. Evan Low says:

    I don’t suppose they have replied?

  3. Evan Low says:

    More fuel for you. UOB Malaysia’s internet don’t need no java.

    https://www.uob.com.my/uob/index.jsp

  4. Junjie says:

    UOB did in fact reply my email very shortly after I sent it and posted this up. Unfortunately it was a standard reply, polite but non-commital.

    Dear Mr Lin

    Thank you for your email.

    We would like to thank you for your feedback and suggestion as it is through such comments that we are able to focus on areas for improvement and further enhance our services to our customers. Please be assured that your feedback has been highlighted to the department concerned for their review for any possible further enhancement of our services in the future.

    Thank you for banking with UOB.

    Should you have any questions, please contact our 24-hour Call Centre on 1800 22 22 121 or +65 622 22 121 (if you are calling from overseas). We will be happy to assist you.

    Yours sincerely

    Denise Chew (Ms)
    Senior Officer
    Call Centre
    United Overseas Bank Limited
    Singapore Company Reg No. 193500026Z

    I just sent another email to follow up:

    Dear Ms Denise,

    Thanks for getting back, I appreciate it.

    Is there any update on your side as to whether UOB intends to improve support on mobile browsers and mobile phones such as the iPhone by removing Java from your login page (I was told that UOB Malaysia does not use Java), or by developing a specific app for the iPhone itself?

    If there are, are they already under development, and when will your customers likely see the improvements implemented? 

    Best regards, Junjie

    Sent from my iPhone

  5. Junjie says:

    Reply to my second email:

    Dear Mr Lin

    Thank you for your email.

    We would like to inform you that there is no news currently on implementing UOB Personal Internet Banking via mobile devices yet but we will inform customers if such plans are going to be implemented in future.

    Thank you for banking with UOB.

    Should you have any questions, please contact our 24-hour Call Centre on 1800 22 22 121 or +65 622 22 121 (if you are calling from overseas). We will be happy to assist you.

    Yours sincerely

    See Kah Leong (Mr) Senior Officer Call Centre United Overseas Bank Limited

  6. Jack says:

    Not up to the competition for UOB Singapore isn’t it? Mobile banking is here to stay, let’s see who’s the last to join the run. UOB or Maybank?

  7. Name* says:

    This is not something they can rollout overnight. If their API or backend is not ready, or they have not found a secured way to deal with such unsecured device (iphone), there is no way they would put their customers at risk.

    Maybank? Still on SQL2000 lol

  8. Kamarol says:

    Actually, for Maybank in Malaysia, I’ve been using my iPhone to do my transactions for a while now. Very convenient.

  9. Ronixus says:

    I’m sure the UOB management is aware of this and has been aware of it way before this blog was posted. This is not something done overnight and requires careful planning and risk assessment. Correct, they may have demonstrated lack of immediate action but they have also shown they take customer security conservatively, keeping only to proven technologies before moving on.

    Give them time. As more companies jump into the iPhone app band wagon, sooner or later, this coveted app will come out.

  10. Joey says:

    I was happily downloading standard chartered bank and dbs bank apps for online banking. Imagine the shock!!! when i search for my ‘fav.’ uob bank apps. LOL!!

    Simply solution bring your money to other bank!! instead of kpkb here.

  11. Junjie says:

    Joey, thanks for your suggestion. My ‘kpkb’ has in fact taken effect.

  12. Erick says:

    This post comes up first when I search for UOB iPhone app. It’s truly disappointing that UOB is so freaking behind in technology. However, I won’t be rushing to open an account at DBS because their banking interface requires that silly device (while UOB supports SMS OTP, which is much much more convenient) and the user design of DBS is crap. Not to mention the physical bank branches at DBS are swarmed with people. OCBC is a third grade bank, and their online banking — with or without mobile support — sucks big time. Citibank and HSBC can cater to clueless expat types and the hidden charges, no bank branches, etc. For now I hope UOB makes it mobile friendly to login (Safari may work) but it still is the best bet in Singapore.

  13. Frank says:

    Uob already allows browsing through safari browser of iphone and ipad…and i know they are already coming with up with an app soon…with tech support as well